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Young people shape every electoral cycle by engaging in activism, working on campaigns, leading conversations about issues, reaching out to peers and relatives, supporting candidates, and casting ballots that can sometimes decide an election and shift the balance of power in the United States. Voting is not the be-all and end-all of youth civic engagement; far from it. But elections are invaluable nationwide opportunities for young people to participate in democracy.

As part of our efforts to broaden youth voting and ensure that more and more diverse young people engage in the electoral process, CIRCLE conducts substantial research on how youth participate in elections. In 2020, we're tracking youth voter registration rates, their views on the candidates, and their involvement in the political process.

We also endeavor to take a step back, look beyond the 'horse race', and examine the myriad social, institutional, and political contexts that can affect whether and how youth participate: emerging activist movements, social media trends, new election laws, and the competitiveness of races across the country. And, as always, we will highlight disparities in youth electoral engagement that illustrate the political marginalization of some youth and communities, with an eye toward closing gaps and redressing inequality.

Explore all of our data, analysis, and commentary on the 2020 election:

Latest 2020 Research

Youth Voting in the 2020 Primaries

Throughout the 2020 presidential primaries, CIRCLE is conducting state-by-state analyses of youth voting in the Democratic Party’s nominating contest as we have done for competitive Republican and Democratic primary cycles in the past. Along with tracking youth turnout rates in each state primary or caucus, we are also analyzing young voters’ preferences for different candidates to evaluate the often pivotal impact young people are having on the outcome of the race.

Our analyses allow us to estimate how many votes young people have cast for each Democratic presidential candidate. We use the same methodology as in 2016, when we found that Senator Bernie Sanders received more youth votes in the primaries than then-candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump combined. We will update this chart after every primary or caucus for which there is data from exit or entrance polls.

 

State by State Analyses

Polling and Other Analyses

Exclusive Youth Polling: Texas

For an exclusive CIRCLE poll conducted in January, we surveyed Texans ages 18-39. We found that 37% say they support Bernie Sanders, followed by 25% for Joe Biden and 18% for Elizabeth Warren. In addition, 39% say they are “extremely likely” to participate in the March 3rd presidential primaries, including 43% of Whites and 38% of Latinos. More than half of those who say they are "very" or "extremely" likely to vote say they plan to do so in the Democratic primary. The poll also highlighted challenges and disparities in electoral outreach, especially to younger Latinos in Texas: 66% of Millennial and Gen Z Texans in our poll, including 75% of Latinos, have not heard from a campaign, suggestigng there’s still a lot of work to do to get younger Texans prepared and excited to vote.

Read more:

Exclusive Youth Polling: Iowa

Young people are poised to influence the direction of the 2020 election, starting with the upcoming, first-in-the-nation Iowa caucuses. In addition to the work young people do on political campaigns and to register voters, a new, exclusive CIRCLE-Tisch College/Suffolk University poll of youth in Iowa (ages 18-29, regardless of party or voter registration) finds that more than a third (35%) say they are “extremely likely” to caucus on February 3rd and, on the Democratic side, they are supporting Senator Bernie Sanders by a substantial margin. According to our poll, 39% of young Iowans who are registered or identify as Democrats intend to caucus for Sanders, followed by 19% for Senator Elizabeth Warren, 14% for Pete Buttigieg, 9% for Andrew Yang, and 7% for former Vice President Joe Biden.

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Background

As we examine youth engagement in 2020, it is useful to recall and consider young people's participation in the previous presidential cycle. In 2016:

  • 39% of eligible young people turned out to vote
  • Young voters favored Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton over President Trump, 55% to 37%
  • There were significant differences in vote choice by race—for example, 48% of White youth voted for Trump and 43% for Clinton, while 83% of Black youth voted for Clinton and 9% for Trump.

2020 Research In the News

Why Younger Voters Matter

KSFR
Our Director Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg shares CIRCLE data and insights on youth voting historically and in the 2020 primaries.