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Republican Voter Suppression Efforts Could Alienate Young Republican Voters

https://www.teenvogue.com/story/republican-voter-suppression-young-people
“As some of these state laws may get more nuanced or may get more confusing language added to them, that makes it harder on ... young people to understand what they can do and how they can access having a voice on issues they care about and that affect them,” CIRCLE Deputy Director Abby Kiesa explains.

Millennial. Mom. Mayor. Another way Michelle Wu reflects a changing Boston

The Boston Globe
“It’s become more normal or normative to have a political voice,” said CIRCLE Director Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg. “It’s an advantage for a candidate like Michelle Wu who really did build community and had a very young campaign team that wasn’t made of seasoned 50-year-olds.”

The Voters Democrats Say Are Crucial to Flipping Texas

The New York Times
Last year, roughly 50 percent of people under the age of 30 voted in the presidential election, an 11-point increase from 2016, according to the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement at Tufts University.

Youth voter turnout in Virginia soared with Trump in office. Will it stay that way?

The Washington Post
Abby Kiesa, CIRCLE’s deputy director, said young people will turn out to the polls even in an off-year election — as long as they are engaged. Turnout among young voters doubled in Virginia’s governor’s race between 2009 and 2017. But it’s up to campaigns to decide if they are going to put in the necessary resources to drive that turnout.

American Democracy Is Sick. Can Colleges Be Part of the Cure?

EdSurge
“If I grow up in a school where I feel like my voice is heard, I know who to go to for change, and I see that effected, that’s going to give me a much greater sense of political efficacy throughout my life than if I don’t have those kinds of experiences as a young person,” says CIRCLE's Kelly Siegel-Stechler.